Home »

Federal Drunk Driving Laws

We are all generally familiar with Texas’ driving while intoxicated (DWI) laws which prohibit operating a motor vehicle in a public place with a breath or blood alcohol level of greater than .08.  Some people do not realize that the State does not have to have a breath or blood test result to prosecute a […]

Read More...

10 Things Every Parent Should Know about the Texas Criminal and Juvenile Justice System

TEN THINGS EVERY PARENT SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE TEXAS CRIMINAL & JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM No federal constitutional right to parental notification Everyone right now is talking about the juvenile interrogation scene in the Making of a Murderer documentary. Parents are often under the mistaken impression that there is a federal constitutional right to be notified […]

Read More...

10 Criminal Law Myths

TEN CRIMINAL LAW MYTHS Most people accused of a crime are guilty. Far too many people assume you must be guilty to be sitting in a courtroom. Nothing could be further from the truth.  There are situations where the police are investigating a crime and honestly believe that a certain person did it.  It is […]

Read More...

Possession is nine-tenths of the law

The old adage “possession is nine-tenths of the law” applied to property disputes and the fact that whoever had physical custody of a piece of property was more likely to win the legal dispute. In the world of criminal-justice, this adage is still often true in drug possession cases.  When there are multiple people in […]

Read More...

The Second Amendment and Stun Guns

On March 21, 2016, the United States Supreme Court issued a per curiam opinion vacating an opinion of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts which had upheld a ban on the possession of stun guns.  The Massachusetts court had given three explanations for its opinion upholding the ban on stun guns.  Those explanations were: Stun guns […]

Read More...

Nichols v. United States

On April 4, 2016, the United States Supreme Court handed down a unanimous opinion holding that the State of Kansas could not require a registered sex offender to update his registration after leaving the State.  The technical legal issue was whether the State a sex offender leaves–that is, the State where he formerly resides–qualifies as […]

Read More...